Biden’s policies aren’t too different from Trump’s (Opinion)

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President Joe Biden shakes hands with Texas Governor Greg Abbott after delivering a letter about the border at the El Paso International Airport in El Paso, Texas. , and Rep. Vicente Gonzalez Jr., D-Texas, right, see. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnick)

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Do your best

Regarding “Abbott to VP, Trump promised major labor shortages” (November 22): This column by Chris Tomlinson caught my attention. Essentially another political controversy, Tomlinson has occasionally gone out of his way to expose serious business misdeeds and is excellent at research. A factual report The greed of gas pipe owners In the year It’s a wonder that 2021’s devastating cold snap diverted natural gas and possibly killed hundreds of Texans. But then, more often than not, Tomlinson seems to be caught up in the omnibus episode attacking former President Donald Trump.

Today it includes Governor Greg Abbott. Many of the Trump policies criticized by Mr. Tomlinson are now being reintroduced by the Biden administration. Examples include building a border fence and returning oppressed Venezuelans to the arms of the socialist dictatorship.

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Please, Mr. Tomlinson, get back to what you do best: exposing the misdeeds and criminal behavior of greedy businessmen and politicians.

Jerry DeFoor, Jersey Village

Latin representation

Regarding “The Houston exhibit reflects John F. Kennedy’s speech and visit with Lulac.” (November 21): I certainly appreciate the reflection on John F. Kennedy’s stop in Houston, and the new exhibit highlights LULAC, as well as the reminder of the importance of JFK’s speech to LULAC. I would also like to point out. As noted in the article, the Latino vote played a significant role in Kennedy’s victory in 1960.

However, it is disheartening to see that even today in 2023, the struggle for Latino representation continues to echo the challenges faced by the Latino community in the 1960s. This can only happen by mobilizing Latino voters. Hopefully, after December 9th, we will have more Latino representation in city government.

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Untested

Regarding “For Mike Miles, HISD ‘innovation’ means more control (editorial).” (Nov. 22): You Houston Independent School District and Superintendent Mike Miles have spoken out against uncertified teachers and are insisting that parents know if their child is being taught by an “uncertified teacher” for more than 30 days. Parents want to know if their child is being taught by a first-year teacher who is certified but “untested.” What about teachers who are now teaching a grade or subject for the first time? Untested” in that arena.

Teaching is a calling, and sometimes people are called to that profession later in life. A teacher is not just someone who has knowledge and imparts knowledge to others. It’s more than that. A teacher must engage with students, elevate a C student to a B, a B to an A, engage and encourage all students to achieve greater excellence. Many of those who leave the corporate world for academia bring with them a wealth of talent that has been honed in their varied work with a variety of people. In some cases, an uncertified, “untested” teacher may excel in areas where a new certified teacher cannot yet.

HISD has been chasing students for years. The status quo is not working in HISD, so let’s give Superintendent Miles the support he needs to make the changes needed to help all students excel.

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I’m glad

When I took driving lessons in high school, we were taught that the only time we should use a car horn is to warn others of an impending danger. It made perfect sense. Car horns, while barely audible, draw one’s attention and awareness. That understanding of horn use must be common throughout the southwestern United States. When we moved here from Oklahoma in 1978, Texas was no different.

Car horns were once rarely used instruments in Texas. They really come in handy when you want to warn other drivers about an impending danger. Or at least, that’s how it worked until recently, when people from other parts of the country started moving here in large numbers.

In other major cities (mainly the tightly packed eastern cities I think) drivers use their horns to complain to other drivers.

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Honk: “Are you waiting for this sign to say ‘go’?”

You are! “Hurry! Move!”

You are! “Get off the highway!”

You are! “I don’t care if you want to go straight. I want to turn on red.

This kind of car horn use leads to a lot of noise and a lot of noise leads us to treat car horns as just another sounding board. In addition to obscuring real warnings, honking is aggressive and can cause anxiety that can lead to road rage.

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With the dire circumstances in the world today, it is clear that this issue cannot rise above all other clearly defined priorities; And there is probably little anyone can do about it. Repeated speakers will continue to sound inappropriately unless there is a final disaster. My only suggestion is this: Even if you love Jesus, don’t knock him. He prefers that you stay calm and practice good driving manners.



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