Staten Island students engage in science at NYC Museum of Natural History | In Class column

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By class: This feature is part of an ongoing education column highlighting various activities involving school communities.

STATEN ISLAND, NY – Staten Island Elementary School students recently got to participate in a week-long residency program at the American Museum of Natural History.

PS 54 in Willowbrook sent two classes to the Manhattan Museum every day for a week — allowing students to participate in a variety of activities at the various exhibits at the museum, said Amanda Henderson, the school’s special education teacher. It’s part of the American Museum of Natural History’s Beyond Elementary Science (BEES) program, a new educational pilot offering New York City public schools a weeklong field trip experience.

The student experience was part of the American Museum of Natural History’s Elementary Science Explorations program. (Courtesy/Amanda Henderson)Amanda Henderson

It is one of three new educational programs launched in conjunction with the opening. Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education and Innovation. Classes are invited to claim the entire museum campus as their classroom for a week and engage with exhibits, collections, teachers and scientists that combine science, math, literacy and social studies for a hands-on, immersive learning experience. The museum uses a multi-sensory approach to meet the needs of all different types of learners.

While a traditional school field trip only lasts one day, BEES transforms that experience into one week. For PS 54 science students, Solomon Family Insectarium Reducing the number of insects worldwide and Davis Family Butterfly Vivarium To observe live butterflies and learn about the life cycle of a butterfly.

During the week-long program, students learned everything there is to know about global ecosystems through the eyes of insects. Students played the roles of entomologists, explored the halls of the museum, asked scientific questions about the behavior and characteristics of insects, modeled local and global ecosystems, explained the role of insects in ecosystems, and designed solutions for the importance of insects.

American Museum of Natural History Field Trip

During the week-long program, students learned everything there is to know about global ecosystems through the eyes of insects. (Courtesy/Amanda Henderson)Amanda Henderson

Students used the museum as a classroom, exploring the African Mammal Hall, Ocean Life Hall, North American Forest Hall, Dinosaur Halls, Biodiversity Hall and more. They were also able to meet different animal “ambassadors” to learn about the role of different insects in the ecosystem.

Efforts will build on the museum’s identity Urban advantage (UA) program, a citywide partnership between the city’s Department of Education (DOE) and cultural organizations that began in 2004 and will serve nearly 100,000 city students by 2022.

American Museum of Natural History Field Trip

PS 54 students participated in a new program that included a week-long field trip experience to the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan. (Courtesy/Amanda Henderson)Amanda Henderson

American Museum of Natural History Field Trip

PS 54 students participated in a new program that included a week-long field trip experience to the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan. (Courtesy/Amanda Henderson)Amanda Henderson

American Museum of Natural History Field Trip

PS 54 students participated in a new program that included a week-long field trip experience to the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan. (Courtesy/Amanda Henderson)Amanda Henderson

American Museum of Natural History Field Trip

PS 54 students participated in a new program that included a week-long field trip experience to the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan. (Courtesy/Amanda Henderson)Amanda Henderson

Register in the following event identity tracking

Earlier this year, thousands of New York City public school students and school staff were among the millions of victims whose personal information was compromised. MOVEit data breach. Approximately 45,000 students – in addition to school staff and related service providers – were affected by the breach. All individuals whose confidential information has been compromised have been notified.

Data affected included: social security numbers, OSIS numbers, birth dates, employee IDs and unauthorized access to approximately 19,00 documents. Those types of documents include student evaluations/related services progress reports, Medicaid reports related to the provision of related services, and internal records related to DOE employee leave.

And it’s not too late to register for identity tracking. The deadline has been extended to December 15.

You have the opportunity to sign up for free credit/identity protection services within two years of receiving a letter from the DOE through your IDX provider about this incident. DOE covers the cost, but you must register and activate the services.

To enroll in Credit/Identity Protection Services, call 1-800-939-4170 or 1-888-429-9444, scan the QR code at the top of your letter, or visit https://app.idx.us/account-creation/protect. It only takes five minutes to sign up.

You will be asked to provide the registration code at the top of your email.

Send us your stories.

Have a story idea for your classroom column? Email education reporter Annalize Knudson at aknudson@siadvance.com.



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